Trauma Is Subjective. Assault Categories Are Not.

Learn how trauma can be subjective but also differentiated on bettysbattleground.com

Since the #metoo campaign went viral, many necessary and important conversations have begun. We¬† dragged the truth about sexual harassment and assault into the light of day, exposing the fact that a disturbing amount of people–especially women–have experienced some form of sexual violence in their lifetimes. Discussions about support and awareness have taken beautiful seed. Rape culture is finally being acknowledged on a wide-spread scale. But there’s one discussion that, while important, has not been able to take place without sounding horribly offensive. That is the conversation about the fact that not all traumatic experiences are the same.

Let me start by saying this: trauma is subjective. The development of post-traumatic stress disorder and other traumatic responses is not only determined by the inciting event. The victim’s biological makeup, personal history, and support system also play a significant role. As do the nuances of the event, which may not appear in the categorizing of the event. It is possible for one person to be more traumatized by having her breasts fondled on a bus than another person who was forcibly raped–really–simply because of all those factors; even though most people would likely say, if made to choose, that they’d rather have their breasts fondled than be forcibly raped. Our anxieties and personal biases create hierarchies of trauma, but that’s not how trauma actually works. There is no way to say that “my trauma was worse than yours,” and even if there was, it would be a silly, disrespectful thing to say. Take it from someone with PTSD: being traumatized is not something to aspire toward.

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The “Opioid Crisis” Is Not A War Against Pain Relief

Why are some chronic pain patients furthering their cause by putting down ours? -bettysbattleground.com

I just encountered a disturbing phenomenon. Maybe I’m the last kid on the bus to notice this, but apparently there’s a sect of chronic pain patients who are opioid crisis deniers. They feel that the deaths of drugs users is inconvenient to their cause. I’m guessing there are tons of these bubbles across the internet, but the 12,000+ strong one I came across on Twitter was headed by a Stanford educated doctor named Thomas Kline.

The tweets these people sent were fairly rambling and incoherent, especially those by Dr. Kline himself, but from what I could gather, they think the lives and deaths of addicted people are inconsequential, and the cause of their own woes. The sad part is, chronic pain patients and people in addiction recovery (or active addiction) have a common enemy, and if we banded together instead of engaging in this petty insane bullshit, maybe we could crush it. The enemy, of course, being STIGMA. Unfortunately, as long as Dr. Kline keeps spewing his pseudoscience to the sycophantic followers that need to believe him with all their souls, that community will never happen.

I’m not bashing chronic pain patients. Many chronic pain patients are on the same page as me. For those that I’m referencing in this post, I don’t blame them. It’s intoxicating to be part of a highly stigmatized population and then to find someone who speaks loudly in your favor, says everything you need said, and is willing to stand up and fight for you. If that person then skews facts and figures in your favor, why wouldn’t you defend him? I don’t blame the patients. But I do blame the doctors.

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The 13 Best Blogs + Articles To Read This Week 8/14

Need something to read? Check out bettysbattleground.com for recommendations

Guess what I noticed? My book recommendations (when they don’t include author interviews) get almost no views, while my blog article recommendations last week were read, clicked through, shared, and commented on! So as much as I love and value literature, I’m going to switch it up and start doing article recommendations, except on those occasions when I have an author interview to go along with the book review. That being said, if you are an author with a book in hardcopy and you’d like to see it reviewed on Betty’s Battleground, contact me. Please note that I’m not able to review writing that is heavily couched in an Abrahamic faith.

Now, let’s get to the recommendations. What are the best articles I’ve read the past two weeks? These cover everything from shampooing away nuclear fallout, to do-able parenting hacks, and come from big news sites and lesser known bloggers alike. Take a look at the best articles this writer has read, and don’t forget to leave your recommendations in the comments.

Oh, last thing! The re-launch of Off-Fridays: THE Mental Illness Blog Share was a success. See what bloggers are saying about depression and suicide here.

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