Parenting with Mental Illness: Andolina (Major Depressive Disorder)

Meet Andolina-on bettysbattleground.com

Parenting with Mental Illness, a feature interview series on bettysbattleground.comI am honored to introduce Andolina as this month’s Parenting with Mental Illness interviewee. She’s a beautiful young mother who lives with Major Depressive Disorder and moderate anxiety. She also lost her father to suicide. I can only imagine what that kind of loss is like, and I thank her for her sharing her story here on Betty’s Battleground. It breaks my heart to hear about yet another woman whose birthday has been ruined possibly forever–this time by a tragic loss.

A person recently left a very interesting comment on my blog post about forgiving our loved ones who commit suicide. She (I’m actually not sure of the person’s gender, but am using “she” for the sake of clarity) noted that she had lost her spouse to suicide several years back. Then she asked me to re-write my post to exclude the term “commit suicide.” She informed me that there is now a movement to have people say “died by suicide” rather than “commit suicide,” due to negative connotations associated with the word commit, and the idea that suicide is an act for which the victim is not culpable.

I’m familiar with these kinds of language movements. There’s one also in place around the word “addict,” for which I’ve had several losing battles with editors on the titles and language within certain of my articles. My problem here is that I’m not sure I agree. I don’t agree that the word commit is inherently negative, nor do I agree that people who attempt suicide have no volition whatsoever. They’re ill, usually, but if we say they have no power, that can be dangerous to people struggling with suicidal ideations. Is our commitment stronger to the living, or the deceased? I do believe we should respect and honor those who lost their lives to suicide. I do believe in awareness. I don’t know how I stand on the language. Will you leave your thoughts in the comments?

And now, Andolina:

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Healing Words: An Author’s Search For Trauma Recovery Through Writing

Brandi Kennedy talks about how writing and mindfulness has helped her recover from chronic abuse on bettysbattleground.com

A guest writer series about the ways we heal-on bettysbattleground.comHey readers, I apologize for missing my Wednesday post this week, but I’d like to call your attention to the article I was busy working on instead.

When I was pregnant and on methadone, I was caught in the Front Range Flood. Well, not caught in it per se, I was just outside of it, but my clinic closed and I couldn’t get to the one that was designated to courtesy dose us. You can read more about it in the article, but it is truly horrifying how unprepared many methadone facilities are for ensuring continuity of care. Unprepared is not even the right word; there are actually plenty of protocols in place, as I learned while researching this piece, but many programs and hospitals choose to turn patients away. It’s unfair, and unconscionable. Imagine going through the worst disaster of your life, and also being in intense opiate withdrawal? You can read it here.

Let’s also remember that while all of this has been going on, massive flooding has been destroying parts of Southeast Asia. More than 1,000 people have died, far higher than the death toll from Harvey.They deserve our care and attention too.

I’m glad that my blog is equipped to have outbound links open in separate windows, because I also don’t want you to miss this guest post from Author Brandi Kennedy. She’s a fiction writer and a poet besides a blogger, and it shows in the beauty of her narration, but the subject is deeply troubling. Despite my own traumatic experiences, I never cease to be shocked by the capacity for pain and cruelty this world holds. I’m glad the assignment I’m writing this weekend focuses on human kindness instead, but for now..let’s read Brandi’s story of recovery through writing and mindfulness.

Author Brandi KennedyRead about Brandi Kennedy's healing through writing on bettysbattleground.com was a survivor before she knew she was a warrior. Through her love of reading, she found temporary escape from the abuse that was an ever-present part of her childhood; through writing, she’s found healing and renewed life. These days, Brandi is a romance novelist and mental health and lifestyle blogger who spends her moments writing her way toward her dreams. Through self-expression, the courage to share honestly, and the desire to weave words into the very magic she once used as escape, Brandi is learning to embrace life as an Undaunted Woman – and hoping to welcome others along on the ride. Read her full bio here.

 

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Tales From The Other Side: How To Literally Sleep Away Your Trauma

How To Literally Sleep Away Your Trauma on bettysbattleground.com

Tales from the Other Side: A guest post series on www.bettysbattleground.comHappy Monday! Did you sleep well last night? If the answer is no, you’re not alone. The Center for Disease Control estimates that over 35% of Americans do not get the recommended amount of sleep. Look at the PTSD population, and that percentage rises much closer to 100%. I’m sure the same is true for the parent population. It’s certainly true for me.

Whether I’m soothing restless toddlers, struggling with anxiety, or combating PTSD nightmares, I rarely get a good night’s rest. So I really appreciate today’s guest post. Agnes Green, a sleep researcher from Tuck sleep (which is linked in my Resources page) describes how sleep disruptions can arise after trauma, and what we can do to help ease them. This is a topic I could certainly use my fair share of help with, and if you have PTSD, are a parent, or both, I’m sure you can too.

Before I direct you to the post, I want to remind you that Off-Fridays, THE Mental Illness Blog Share is open for links on the subject of addiction. I know it’s scary to discuss, but there are a lot of major problems in the recovery industry, not to mention the generally terrible attitude toward addicts. We won’t change those realities unless we talk about those realities, so I urge you to join in the link-up by adding your links. Help make this a truly revolutionary addiction-fighting resource!

And now, let’s meet the lovely Agnes.

Learn what sleep researcher Agnes Green has to say about trauma and sleep on bettysbattleground.comAgnes Green is a researcher for the sleep science site Tuck Sleep. She holds two master’s degrees in the social sciences from the University of Chicago and Northwestern University. She sleeps most soundly after a kettlebell workout, with breeze wafting in through a cracked window, and on a medium-firm mattress in Portland, Oregon.

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