Healing Words: Helping A Loved One Heal After An Abusive Relationship

How to help a loved one heal after abuse--bettysbattleground.com

I think many of us are at a place in our lives where we recognize a great deal of injustice and pain occurring around us, but may be feeling helpless about how to help. It’s a terrible feeling to care, but have no idea how to show it or what to do. Today, guest writer Jennifer Scott shares some tips for helping with one particularly difficult-to-address scenario: helping a loved one heal after an abusive relationship.

Jennifer Scott discusses helping a loved one heal after an abusive relationshipJennifer Scott shares stories about the ups and downs of her anxiety and depression at SpiritFinder.org. She offers a forum where those living with anxiety and depression can discuss their experiences.

 

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15 Outdoor Activities To Promote Mental Healthiness In Kids + Parents

15 Outdoor Activities fir Mental Healthiness on bettysbattleground.com

I don’t know about where you live, but I feel like the Pacific Northwest had to be dragged kicking and screaming into nice weather this year. But it finally arrived! Spring showers are coming to a close and Summer is (just about) here. In the Great PNW, Spring and Summer are really something to be celebrated. We spend six months under a ceaseless skyscape of rainthick clouds, so when the flowers start to bloom…and then fruit…when the sun shines and the sky blushes blue, it’s time to go outside and soak it up.

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But even if you live somewhere that gets year round sunshine, Summer is a great time to bond with your kiddos. School’s out. Kids come home, and the great outdoors are calling. Of course, there is always the temptation of screens, and I’m not saying never use them. This blog wouldn’t exist without a screen! Screens have their uses, but too much time in front of one, and too little time moving around outdoors can actually increase anxiety and depression, even if staying in with a movie feels like the best antidote to social anxiety or some other type of episode.

Now, I’m not trying to suggest that mental illness can be cured through exercise and sunshine. I sure wish a good run in the sun could erase my PTSD; unfortunately mental illness involves neurological changes which take a lot of intentional work to manage, including physical, mental, and emotional.

That being said, studies confirm what I have personally experienced: even 10-15 minutes Kids need to play outdoors for good mental health-and so do parents! on bettysbattleground.comof exercise each day can help balance neurochemistry by promoting the production of endorphins and serotonin. Sunshine is also loaded with Vitamin D, and helps to reduce symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder.  So, while your mental illness can’t be cured by a walk in the sun, that walk can, in fact, ameliorate some of your symptoms.

Joe from Nature Rated was kind enough to write a post for Betty’s Battleground about the benefits of exercise and outdoor play, along with an infographic detailing some outdoor activities to do with your kiddos. A couple of these activities require the privilege of a home with a backyard; something I, and many parents with mental illnesses don’t have; most of them, however, can be executed or adapted to fit anyone on even the tightest budgets. So I’m really excited to share this guest post with you, while I wrap up my daughter’s birthday celebrations and get back to “real life” (and blog posts written by moi). I hope you and your family enjoy these activities!

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The Suicide Survivor’s Guide: 3 Ways to Recognize Suicidal Behavior, and How You Can Help

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It has been a heavy week on Betty’s Battleground.

Last Wednesday I posted the letter I didn’t write when I attempted suicide on my birthday last year.

On Monday, I kicked off my guest post series “Tales From the Other Side” with a beautiful and heartbreaking letter written to the sister Connie Hulsart, from the blog Essentially Broken, lost to suicide.

I know, this blog has not been the easiest to read this past week. Nor the easiest to publish, believe me. But it is important to understand suicide. The mentality behind it, which I showcased in my letter; the complex effects and aftermath, which Connie demonstrated with grace and raw honesty in hers, and also how to recognize suicidal behaviors in others and what to do about it.

Suicide is very serious. It is the 10th leading cause of the death in the United States, and, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, there are twenty-five more attempts for every single completed suicide. And that’s just what’s reported. We have no way of quantifying the attempts, completed suicides, and ideations that occur unreported or unrecognized. According to the World Health Organization, over 800,000 people die from suicide each year. It is approximated that someone, somewhere on the planet, completes a suicide every 40 seconds.

Let that sink in.

Every 40 seconds.  That means that in the time you have been reading this, at least one person has died by his own hand.

Suicide merits understanding.

I am not a psychological expert. I cannot replace the advice of professionals. But I have been there. Many, many times. My most serious attempt was in 2016, but it was not my first. Besides my other attempts, I have considered suicide on numerous occasions. I have spent years in a suicidal state, mostly due to my PTSD.  I am going to wrap up what has become “Suicide Week” on Betty’s Battleground with a Suicide Survivor’s Guide to Recognizing Suicidal Behavior, and some suggestions on how to help. Some of these are research based; many are based on my experiences with being suicidal.  As I said, I cannot replace the advice and opinion of a psychological expert. If you believe that you or someone you know is suicidal, it is a good idea to talk to a professional. You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255. In my opinion, it is always beneficial to combine the knowledge of experts with the knowledge of experience, so here is what I have learned from being suicidal:

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