Healing Words: Treating The Effects of PTSD On Family Members

Writer Avery Philips discusses ways to mitigate family stress when one member has PTSD--on bettysbattleground.com

It’s a pretty plain fact that when one member of a family has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), other members of the family feel it in one way or another. This isn’t as terrible as it might sound to some. If one member of the family has a bad day at work, it’s going to affect other members of the family in some way. If one person wins the lottery, that is going to affect other members of the family–hopefully because he shares the wealth and not because he runs away with a supermodel. In any case, families are units. What happens to one person will affect the others. So when someone experiences trauma and develops PTSD, those who love her will feel some effects as well. This guest post by freelance writer Avery Phillips talks about some of the ways we can relieve the burden of that stress, and help the ones we love deal with trauma while also staying healthy ourselves.

Avery T. Philips, guest writer on bettysbattleground.comAvery T. Phillips is a freelance human being with too much to say. She loves nature and examining human interactions with the world. Comment or tweet her @a_taylorian with any questions or suggestions.

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How I’ve Been Dealing With PTSD When My Supports Failed

Find out what happens to someone with PTSD when all supports fail-on bettysbattleground.com

Feelings of worthlessness. Social anxiety. Telephonophobia. A sense of foreshortened life. Cherophobia. Agoraphobia. Nightmares that feel like a portal to hell. Physical numbing. Emotional numbing. Suicidal ideation. Suicidal intent. Low self-esteem. Poor sense of danger. Hypervigilance. Rage. Body aches. Depression. Fatigue. Susceptibility to chemical dependency and addiction. Inability to trust others. Inability to show affection. Inability to receive affection. Extreme isolation. Hallucinations. Fear for loved ones. Tendency to push loved ones away. Expectations of loss. Expectations of harm. Self-harm. Derealization. Depersonalization. Personality dissociation. Flashbacks. Panic attacks. Generalized anxiety. Aggression. Inability to work. Obsession with loss. Fear.

These are just some of the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. While not everyone lives with all of these symptoms, many of us live with a lot of them. If you don’t have PTSD, imagine living with just one or two, all the time. Those of us living in the aftermath of trauma have to battle debilitating symptoms on a constant basis. It can’t easily be done alone. We rely on our supports to function. So what happens when all of our supports–or even just a great majority of our supports–fail to come through? That is what has happened to me this past month, so I’m at a great vantage point to talk about it.

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Healing Words: How I Fought Depression With Medication

Learn how motherhood and mental health blogger MomMandy fought depression with medication on bettysbattleground.com

A guest writer series about the ways we heal-on bettysbattleground.comToday’s guest post comes from MomMandy, a mama who struggles with depression and who was featured previously as one of the Parenting With Mental Illness interviewees.

In this article by Mandy, a mother who hails from the Netherlands, she describes her lifelong struggle with depression, and how a combination of therapy, self-care, and antidepressant medication helps her manage it. Right now I am putting together an article about medication and the stigma faced by people who use it. There are different levels of stigma associated with different medications. For example, the focus of the article I’m writing is methadone and buprenorphine, both used to treat opiate dependency and addiction. But medicine for other mental health conditions face a fair amount of stigma too. How many times you have you seen that meme telling people pills are shit and trees are medicine? Did you know that many advocates of the 12-step program do not consider users of appropriately prescribed psychiatric medication, including antidepressants, sober? Stigma is real and it is rampant. So I commend Mandy for standing up and advocating for the medicine that has allowed her to thrive.

Mom Mandy discusses depression and medication on bettysbattleground.comMandy is a 33 year old working mom. She is married to a graphic designer and is the mom of a three year old. Mandy is currently in the midst of a career change and will be going to nursing school in September.  She blogs about trying to live a balanced life on www.mommandy.com You can follow her on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/MomMandy84/

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