Tales From The Other Side: How To Literally Sleep Away Your Trauma

How To Literally Sleep Away Your Trauma on bettysbattleground.com

Tales from the Other Side: A guest post series on www.bettysbattleground.comHappy Monday! Did you sleep well last night? If the answer is no, you’re not alone. The Center for Disease Control estimates that over 35% of Americans do not get the recommended amount of sleep. Look at the PTSD population, and that percentage rises much closer to 100%. I’m sure the same is true for the parent population. It’s certainly true for me.

Whether I’m soothing restless toddlers, struggling with anxiety, or combating PTSD nightmares, I rarely get a good night’s rest. So I really appreciate today’s guest post. Agnes Green, a sleep researcher from Tuck sleep (which is linked in my Resources page) describes how sleep disruptions can arise after trauma, and what we can do to help ease them. This is a topic I could certainly use my fair share of help with, and if you have PTSD, are a parent, or both, I’m sure you can too.

Before I direct you to the post, I want to remind you that Off-Fridays, THE Mental Illness Blog Share is open for links on the subject of addiction. I know it’s scary to discuss, but there are a lot of major problems in the recovery industry, not to mention the generally terrible attitude toward addicts. We won’t change those realities unless we talk about those realities, so I urge you to join in the link-up by adding your links. Help make this a truly revolutionary addiction-fighting resource!

And now, let’s meet the lovely Agnes.

Learn what sleep researcher Agnes Green has to say about trauma and sleep on bettysbattleground.comAgnes Green is a researcher for the sleep science site Tuck Sleep. She holds two master’s degrees in the social sciences from the University of Chicago and Northwestern University. She sleeps most soundly after a kettlebell workout, with breeze wafting in through a cracked window, and on a medium-firm mattress in Portland, Oregon.

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Tales From The Other Side: “Growing Up With An Untreated Bipolar Mom”

Read about one woman's experience growing up with a mom who had untreated bipolar disorder-on bettysbattleground.com

Tales from the Other Side: A guest post series on www.bettysbattleground.comToday’s guest blogger, Christy, grew up in a household with a mother who had untreated Bipolar Disorder. I can’t claim to have the same experience, or anything remotely like it, but I do have an aunt who has untreated Bipolar disorder. We stopped speaking a couple years ago when she started calling me a bitch, excusing herself because of her own disorder, and then gaslighting my PTSD. Ever since then, I have occasionally seen rude comments about me that she’s left on other family’ member’s accounts. Anyway, she lives in New York so I don’t have to really bother with her, but I learned today that she’s coming to Seattle, AND she’s asked to see my kids. So I guess I’m gonna get to have another epic Tia A—- adventure!

Anyway, as annoying and borderline abusive as my aunt has been, it does not compare to Christy’s experiences. Please don’t misunderstand the intention of publishing this story. I in no way wish to demonize people with Bipolar Disoder. I previously hosted an interview and guest post by a Sheila O’Donnell, a lovely blogger living with BPAD. I published an author interview with Rebecca Lombardo, who wrote a book about her experiences being Bipolar. The late, and beloved, Carrie Fisher was a famous mental health advocate living with the disorder. However, all of these people also pursued treatment. Whether that means medication and talk therapy, exercise and self-care, writing and reaching out, or whatever-they manage their symptoms and actively seek treatment. Mental illness does not have to be harmful. Usually, it isn’t. But if a person has a serious mental disorder and a family, that disorder will affect her family. If she doesn’t get her disorder treated, it may harm her family.

We cannot silence true stories because they don’t fit the narrative we want to tell. I am a mental health advocate. I want people to understand that mental illness or injury doesn’t make people evil or abusive. But I also cannot lie and say that when people don’t pursue treatment of any kind, everything is OK. It’s not. Those of us with mental health conditions need outside support, but we also need inner drive. Christy’s story is an example of a family that was deeply harmed because their Bipolar mother did not pursue treatment.

Blogger Christy Zelaya opens up about growing up with a mom who had untreated bipolar disorder on bettysbattleground.comChristy Zelaya is 38 years old and lives in beautiful Bradenton, Florida. She lives with her husband Jose Zelaya, and their four children; two each from previous marriages. They also have two dogs who are their babies too! They have been living as a blended family for almost seven years. Jose was diagnosed with kidney failure in February of 2014 and is now on dialysis. They are hoping for a kidney transplant soon. Christy also lives with Rhematoid Arthritis, which is exacerbated by her weight issues. You can follow her journey at christyzspeaks.com.

 

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Tales From The Other Side: Is PTSD Contagious?

Tales from the Other Side: A guest post series on www.bettysbattleground.com

Today’s guest post covers a topic that is not discussed often, especially within the PTSD community. Is PTSD contagious? Of course, in the common usage of the word “contagious,” it is not. PTSD is not a virus or a bacteria. You can’t get it from touching someone or breathing the same air as a trauma survivor. However, “witnessed PTSD” is a real phenomenon, one to which children are especially prone, but which anyone from any demographic can acquire.

This story is different even from that. Patricia Eden, or “PTSD Wifey,” as she prefers to be known, is a blogger and PTSD advocate who acquired PTSD after her husband experienced a direct trauma. Vicarious PTSD typically occurs when someone witnesses or hears about a highly disturbing trauma which someone close to them experienced. This wife claims, however, that she earned her diagnosis after a year of experiencing her husband’s PTSD symptoms. When I first heard this, I had a lot of questions. So I invited her to write this guest post.

The answer isn’t one that is easy for me to face. Earlier this week I explored the ways in which my mental health affects my family. My husband and I both have PTSD, and like anybody with PTSD, we both get triggered at times. My kids can share our air, our food, even our drinks without worry. But can they share our space when one of us gets triggered? When I read this essay, it made me realize all the more that we need more supports-not less-for parents with mental health conditions. We don’t deserve to have our children taken from us, but we do need reliefs and supports for our safety as well as our family’s.

PTSD Wifey discusses vicarious PTSD and its potential for contagion on bettysbattleground.comPatricia Eden is the voice behind PTSDWifey. She is a mother of two beautiful daughters and a wife to an outstanding husband who is recovering from Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and she has Vicarious PTSD. As the author of a unique blog written from the supportive partner’s perspective; PTSDWifey hopes to be an inspiration and a beacon of light for others affected by PTSD. She is working on registering as a non-profit to provide previously unavailable resources to families and individuals suffering from non-combat related PTSD & CPTSD. Connect with her on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and learn more about our invisible disease and find support, remission, and recovery! For more articles like this visit www.ptsdwifey.com  Don’t forget to say hello while you are there!

A guest post about vicarious PTSD

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