The “Opioid Crisis” Is Not A War Against Pain Relief

Why are some chronic pain patients furthering their cause by putting down ours? -bettysbattleground.com

I just encountered a disturbing phenomenon. Maybe I’m the last kid on the bus to notice this, but apparently there’s a sect of chronic pain patients who are opioid crisis deniers. They feel that the deaths of drugs users is inconvenient to their cause. I’m guessing there are tons of these bubbles across the internet, but the 12,000+ strong one I came across on Twitter was headed by a Stanford educated doctor named Thomas Kline.

The tweets these people sent were fairly rambling and incoherent, especially those by Dr. Kline himself, but from what I could gather, they think the lives and deaths of addicted people are inconsequential, and the cause of their own woes. The sad part is, chronic pain patients and people in addiction recovery (or active addiction) have a common enemy, and if we banded together instead of engaging in this petty insane bullshit, maybe we could crush it. The enemy, of course, being STIGMA. Unfortunately, as long as Dr. Kline keeps spewing his pseudoscience to the sycophantic followers that need to believe him with all their souls, that community will never happen.

I’m not bashing chronic pain patients. Many chronic pain patients are on the same page as me. For those that I’m referencing in this post, I don’t blame them. It’s intoxicating to be part of a highly stigmatized population and then to find someone who speaks loudly in your favor, says everything you need said, and is willing to stand up and fight for you. If that person then skews facts and figures in your favor, why wouldn’t you defend him? I don’t blame the patients. But I do blame the doctors.

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Off-Fridays Mental Illness Blog Share, Week 6: Addiction

Share you writing about addiction here-#offfridays

Hello and welcome to Off-Fridays. If you’re new here, Off-Fridays is a blog share that converts to a link library and themed resource page once it closes for links. Anyone is welcome to join so long as your links are on-topic and not abusive. The rules page can further explain what Betty’s Battleground considers abusive (hint: controversial does not mean abusive). This week’s topic is addiction.

Addiction is a big scary word that not a lot of people think they know much about, even though many of us have experienced it in some form or another. If you want to test just how much you know about addiction, check out “Is/Is Not: Addiction,” a game I created this month to test people’s ideas about certain commonly misunderstood topics. Addiction is so widely demonized and misunderstood that I have begun to make it a personal mission to very publicly overshare the realities of my own addiction. Before I send you to the page where you can leave you links, I want to share a brief story.

I read an article the other day by a well-versed writer who had some heavy duty, prestigious credits like Al-Jazeera and CNN. The article was well-written–no complaints there. Engaging too. I even shared it around some. But at one point the writer described her ex-husband, who she had discovered using drugs. First, she found a tinfoil with burned, tarry traces zigzagging across it. Then, she noticed his pupils were the size of pins. Finally, she confirmed what she’d been suspecting: he was high on METH! Does anyone else see the problem here?

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Game Time! Is/Is Not: Addiction

Find out how much you know about addiction by playing "Is/Is Not: Addiction" on bettysbattleground.com

I have something new for you today! There are a lot of misconceptions about various topics that affect many people in this world. So many misconceptions. I’m sure I hold a few. But, having been through some things that sit or cross those borders of “normal human experience” I also know the reality of many misunderstood topics. So I’m starting a new game! It’s called “Is/Is Not,” and in this game we’re going to dig into some common misconceptions about certain topics. Today we’ll be exploring addiction.

Addiction: the big scary beast that people oscillate between demonizing and appropriating. Everywhere we go, we constantly see misrepresentations of addiction. It is a loaded topic, and one that I have tons of personal experience with. But I have also held misconceptions about addiction and addicts in the past, so I’ll be addressing some of my own weird stereotypes here as well. Let’s play, shall we?

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