Healing Words: “The Life Saving Effects Of EMDR”

Learn about one complex trauma's experiences with EMDR-bettysbattleground.comA guest writer series about the ways we heal-on bettysbattleground.comI am really excited about today’s post. Last month, Karin opened up about parenting with PTSD in a Parenting With Mental Illness interview. Today, she shares her experiences with EMDR-Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing.

I had not heard of EMDR before interviewing Karin. After learning that she credited this rather confusing practice with an almost complete recovery from complex trauma, I began noticing mentions of it around the recovery community. People were tweeting 140 word reviews of their experiences with it, raving (and ranting) in online threads, and sharing EMDR directories across social media. I’m sure this had been going on all along, but, thanks to Karin, I was finally noticing it.

Right now, I can’t afford EMDR, and I’m still not totally clear on how it works. But my interest is definitely piqued. Maybe one day. As Karin says, even if it doesn’t help, it won’t hurt.

Karin is an academic by day and a writer and blogger by night and weekend. A single mom to Murphy, her self-named tween son with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Bella Bird (the conure), McFlurry and Cheeseburger (the hermit crabs), Eon (the clownfish) and Ion (the peppermint shrimp), and Dark Lord Cheeto and Crowned Prince Nedward (the cats), she spends her spare time taste-testing boxed wine, reading pop fiction, mastering the art of pasta-making and watching the spectacular sunsets in Key West. Her blog, www.iamthekraken.com, follows their hilarious adventures through life and their adjustment to living in paradise.

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Tales From the Other Side: “My Letter to My Sister After Her Suicide”

Tales from the Other Side: A guest post series on www.bettysbattleground.com

“My Letter to My Sister After Her Suicide” is the first installation of my Guest Post Series: Tales From the Other Side

If you have been following my blog, you know that I write about my experiences as a mother who lives with mental illness, specifically; PTSD and (recovering) co-morbid substance addiction as the result of surviving severe, prolonged domestic abuse. There is a lot of stigma around mental illness, addiction, and abuse. I think it is important that those of us who have lived or are living with these conditions speak out so that the world can see what we go through, and also that we are human. Relatable, real, maybe even (gasp) likable humans.

We are not the only ones affected by our conditions, however. The people who live with us, love us, work with us, and know us are also affected, often deeply. Last week I wrote about my recent(ish) suicide attempt.  I shared the letter I didn’t write, but would have written if I had been able to communicate my thoughts and feelings at the time.  This week, I want to share with you the letter written by one woman to her sister whose suicide attempt was successful.

This letter is raw, heartwrenching, and even funny at times. It is, ultimately, honest. I am so honored to be able to share it here.

Another issue that the letter briefly mentions is possible witnessed PTSD; sometimes the people who come in contact with our conditions inherit similar conditions themselves. Witnessed PTSD is less understood than experienced PTSD, but it is the same disorder as mine except that it arises from witnessing a traumatic event, rather than directly experiencing it.

One last thing I would like to say before I share the letter and some details about its author: I have been suicidal. I know that feeling worthless and unloved comes hand-in-hand with wanting to die. And now, having lived through it, I also know that the feeling is a delusion. You don’t have to be popular and constantly surrounded by people to be loved. If you are feeling suicidal, please just know, just believe that there is someone out there who will write a letter like this to you if you leave them. Chances are, you even know who that person is. Chances are, you love them too. Please think, truly think, about the real consequences of your decision before you make it.
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