Fiction Fridays: “Just Another Morning”

Fiction Fridays on www.bettysbattleground.com

Hello! Welcome to Friday.

It’s Fiction Fridays #7!

Now that my family has gotten over The Plague, I have it. I almost didn’t put anything up today at all..but I created Fiction Fridays for a reason! And that reason was to make me WRITE FICTION at least once a week. So it’s short this week, and written through the haze of headache and bodyache and all sorts of aches, but it’s here.

I love all the well wishers of the world! You’re so kind. But: If you’re leaving a comment on the post, please please please say something about the fiction, and not just “I hope you get better soon, etc.” Fiction Fridays is my way of taking back my life, if even for just a day. It’s about something I love and loved before I was ever abused. It’s not something that has happened TO me (like abuse, or sickness, etc) but something I am actively DOING. While I appreciate your support (I really do) for Fridays, please comment on the fiction. If you have nothing to say about the story but feel compelled to comment, then please share this somewhere that it can be seen by potential contest entrants, and let me know where that was!

I don’t have a new writer to share with you this week because nobody entered the Fiction Fridays 6 writing prompt. That makes me sad. And suspicious. All you people leaving comments about the prompt inspiring you…hmmmm…

I hope you like this week’s prompt better. I LOVE showcasing other writers and bloggers! Since I don’t have any other writing to share this week, I will take this space to share a little more about Maria. Maria is a mama living with Postpartum Depression. She was kind and brave enough to be my first Parenting with Mental Illness interviewee. You can read her story right here. If you haven’t yet, I suggest you do. It’s pretty eye-opening.

I also opened a fundraiser for Maria, to help her continue to get access to care for her PPD. She has had it for about two years, but has only been able to get care for one month. Already, the expense has been hefty. As anyone who is raising kids on a singe-income (and she has three) knows, any added expense can be a tremendous stress. Extra stress is the last thing Maria needs right now. Her husband will be away for work soon, which leaves Maria alone with PPD and three kids. Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could her get some funds for therapy or maybe a babysitter? She does not have any family or anyone around to help her while her husband is away. Although Maria did not ask me to open this fundraiser, I know that she could really use the help.

Guess what? I did some maths…and realized something pretty amazing! If everyone who visited Betty’s Battleground in one day donated just $10, we would exceed the fundraiser goal in less than a day. Wow! I know that there are times when even $10 is hard to come by. I parent with a mental illness too and as a result have no income and don’t even have a bank card with which to make a donation. If you’re in that boat with Maria and I, then would you help by sharing her fundraiser? If you’re not; if giving away $10 won’t overdraft your bank account, could ya please do it? Would you please donate just $10 to Maria’s Care Fund and ensure that she continues to be able to access the care she needs to recover from her PPD while her husband is away? I’ll make it easy for you. Here’s the link:

Thank you in advance for reaching out across the intarwebs and helping this brave young mama overcome a debilitating circumstance that she did not ask for or deserve.

And now, for some fiction…

FF 7 Just Another Morning-bettysbattleground.com

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Parenting With Mental Illness: Maria (PPD)

Parenting with Mental Illness, a feature interview series on bettysbattleground.com

I have been putting together this series behind the curtains for a while now, almost as long as Betty’s Battleground has been live, and I am really excited and honored to launch it today.

“Parenting with Mental Illness” is an interview series featuring parents battling mental illness. Mental illness is an unparalleled struggle even without having children in your care, but when the pressures of being the caretaker for a beautiful young life gets paired with the battles of living with mental illness, the difficulties sometimes feel insurmountable. But they are surmountable. Those of us who live through it prove that everyday. We often live this reality in silence, however, feeling judged and ashamed by our circumstances. This series aims to lift some of stigma surrounding parenting with mental illness. My hope is that those on the outside will gain some compassion and insight toward what we deal with on a daily basis, and that those also living through this will realize it is okay to be who they are, and to seek help. Please remember: Shaming drives people further into the darkness. It is only through radical acceptance that people begin the journey of change.

Before I introduce you to the first brave interviewee, I want to say a few words about my Abuelita. She died one year ago today, at the age of 100. She lived a long and full life, so her death was no tragedy, but I still miss her every day. Sometimes my grief is quiet, like a murmur in the background of my day, and sometimes it wails and brings me to tears at random moments. My Abuelita was a beautiful woman. Born in Chile to a Cuban mother and British father, she traveled across Latin America during her childhood, before finally settling in Cuba, where she would marry the love of her life, an English teacher, and bear her five children. In 1966, amid the turmoil of a new government, she would leave her mansion home with the tadpole-filled pool in the back, and jasmine bushes in the front, to move with her family as refugees into a small studio in New Jersey. She would live in New Jersey the rest of her life, and though she would never regain the comforts she had known in Cuba, she would improve her economic situation enough to be a world traveler through her 80s. She was a vivacious, gentle soul who love to sing, write poetry, and read Agatha Christie. She possessed a rare, youthful beauty which did not diminish with age. She died one century and a handful of months after she was born. Though she had five children, she would be a grandmother to only one-a little girl who she would love unconditionally through all of the child’s various turmoils and disgraces. She would live to hold her eldest great-grandson, and to talk on the phone with her two younger great-granddaughters, all of whom she cherished.

My Abuelita was perhaps the only person who loved me no matter what, and I suspect I will miss her for the rest of my life.

Elizabeth Brico's Abuelita bettysbattleground.com

Stella Blair with one of her daughters, 1916-2016

And now, I present to you another beautiful soul: Maria, who mothers with Postpartum Depression.

Meet Maria: A Mother with PPD on bettysbattleground.com

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