Crazy-Sitting And Thoughts Of Suicide

I am feeling suicidal and I need people with me

Thoughts of suicide are common in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and other mental illnesses, or who are going through hardship in life. Although suicidal ideations are fairly common, they do not in and of themselves indicate that a person will actually commit suicide. That does not, however, mean they should be ignored. Even if a person is claiming thoughts of suicide “just to get attention,” those claims should always be listened to and responded to with compassion, care, and support–preferably in-person support. Ignoring suicidal “cries for attention” can lead to actual suicide.Responding can be as simple as sitting in a room with the person, holding them, sleeping near them, or giving them a hug. If you can’t be physically with them, phone calls or texts are the next best solution. But this is in response to suicidal feelings and ideations. If someone is truly suicidal, then being left alone is never an appropriate response (unless, of course, you hope for that person to die–let’s hope there’s nobody out there whose friends and family actually want them to die).

Continue reading

Why Being Judgy Is A Privilege (That You Probably Shouldn’t Use)

If you're judging others, you need to work on yourself--on bettysbattleground.com

Being judgy is a privilege. And while having privileges can be a positive thing, this is one in particular you probably shouldn’t be using. At least not as much as you might be.

Everyone is judgmental to an extent. Being a little bit judgmental is actually helpful; after all, assessing whether you should skirt the guy with the creepy grin who’s been following you involves making a judgment. Judgments keep us safe, they help us make friends, accomplish goals, and all sorts of wonderful, important stuff. But “being judgy” isn’t quite the same thing as making a judgment call. And it’s generally not so nice–when we’re “judgy,” we are usually putting someone else down for a characteristic we perceive to be flawed.

Continue reading

The “Opioid Crisis” Is Not A War Against Pain Relief

Why are some chronic pain patients furthering their cause by putting down ours? -bettysbattleground.com

I just encountered a disturbing phenomenon. Maybe I’m the last kid on the bus to notice this, but apparently there’s a sect of chronic pain patients who are opioid crisis deniers. They feel that the deaths of drugs users is inconvenient to their cause. I’m guessing there are tons of these bubbles across the internet, but the 12,000+ strong one I came across on Twitter was headed by a Stanford educated doctor named Thomas Kline.

The tweets these people sent were fairly rambling and incoherent, especially those by Dr. Kline himself, but from what I could gather, they think the lives and deaths of addicted people are inconsequential, and the cause of their own woes. The sad part is, chronic pain patients and people in addiction recovery (or active addiction) have a common enemy, and if we banded together instead of engaging in this petty insane bullshit, maybe we could crush it. The enemy, of course, being STIGMA. Unfortunately, as long as Dr. Kline keeps spewing his pseudoscience to the sycophantic followers that need to believe him with all their souls, that community will never happen.

I’m not bashing chronic pain patients. Many chronic pain patients are on the same page as me. For those that I’m referencing in this post, I don’t blame them. It’s intoxicating to be part of a highly stigmatized population and then to find someone who speaks loudly in your favor, says everything you need said, and is willing to stand up and fight for you. If that person then skews facts and figures in your favor, why wouldn’t you defend him? I don’t blame the patients. But I do blame the doctors.

Continue reading