Crazy-Sitting And Thoughts Of Suicide

I am feeling suicidal and I need people with me

Thoughts of suicide are common in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and other mental illnesses, or who are going through hardship in life. Although suicidal ideations are fairly common, they do not in and of themselves indicate that a person will actually commit suicide. That does not, however, mean they should be ignored. Even if a person is claiming thoughts of suicide “just to get attention,” those claims should always be listened to and responded to with compassion, care, and support–preferably in-person support. Ignoring suicidal “cries for attention” can lead to actual suicide.Responding can be as simple as sitting in a room with the person, holding them, sleeping near them, or giving them a hug. If you can’t be physically with them, phone calls or texts are the next best solution. But this is in response to suicidal feelings and ideations. If someone is truly suicidal, then being left alone is never an appropriate response (unless, of course, you hope for that person to die–let’s hope there’s nobody out there whose friends and family actually want them to die).

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Parenting with Mental Illness: Andolina (Major Depressive Disorder)

Meet Andolina-on bettysbattleground.com

Parenting with Mental Illness, a feature interview series on bettysbattleground.comI am honored to introduce Andolina as this month’s Parenting with Mental Illness interviewee. She’s a beautiful young mother who lives with Major Depressive Disorder and moderate anxiety. She also lost her father to suicide. I can only imagine what that kind of loss is like, and I thank her for her sharing her story here on Betty’s Battleground. It breaks my heart to hear about yet another woman whose birthday has been ruined possibly forever–this time by a tragic loss.

A person recently left a very interesting comment on my blog post about forgiving our loved ones who commit suicide. She (I’m actually not sure of the person’s gender, but am using “she” for the sake of clarity) noted that she had lost her spouse to suicide several years back. Then she asked me to re-write my post to exclude the term “commit suicide.” She informed me that there is now a movement to have people say “died by suicide” rather than “commit suicide,” due to negative connotations associated with the word commit, and the idea that suicide is an act for which the victim is not culpable.

I’m familiar with these kinds of language movements. There’s one also in place around the word “addict,” for which I’ve had several losing battles with editors on the titles and language within certain of my articles. My problem here is that I’m not sure I agree. I don’t agree that the word commit is inherently negative, nor do I agree that people who attempt suicide have no volition whatsoever. They’re ill, usually, but if we say they have no power, that can be dangerous to people struggling with suicidal ideations. Is our commitment stronger to the living, or the deceased? I do believe we should respect and honor those who lost their lives to suicide. I do believe in awareness. I don’t know how I stand on the language. Will you leave your thoughts in the comments?

And now, Andolina:

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Healing Words: The Power Of Touch

A guest writer series about the ways we heal-on bettysbattleground.com

Hello! Welcome to Friday. I am extra excited about today’s guest post. If you have ever visited my guest post info page, you may have seen mention of a series called “Healing Words.” For the past several months I have been gathering stories about healing and recovery from trauma survivors and professionals; today, I begin sharing them with you!

“Healing Words” opens with Stephanie, who lost her brother suddenly to a mysterious illness while he was overseas. In her story she talks about the intense, life-changing grief she experienced, and then walks us through her process of recovery. Now, she is a healer, who uses a combination of massage and talk therapy to help others struggling with trauma and grief.

At some point, grief touches all of us. It comes in many forms. We grieve the loss of  those we love, or our pets who have served as our companions for years; we grieve losing an ability due to injury or trauma; we grieve relationships that fail, and potential which does not come to fruition. Grief comes in many forms, and coping with grief is a normal human function. Sometimes, however, loss is sudden and traumatic, and grief overwhelms us. When that happens, we need help moving on. Moving on does not mean forgetting those whom we lost, and it does not mean “getting over” the loss; it means finding a place of peaceful acceptance within ourselves so that we may continue to live. Read Stephanie’s story to learn one approach to healing and moving forward from traumatic grief.

Stephanie HarrisRead a guest post on healing from traumatic grief by Stephanie Harris on bettysbattleground.com is a New Zealand-based writer and coach, specializing in grief. Raised in South Africa, she graduated with honors from the Cape Peninsula University of Technology in Cape Town with a diploma in somatology. She is a professional bodywork therapist who incorporates her knowledge of the physiological impact of grief into work with clients and ongoing research. Stephanie’s career has taken her around the globe, from the Maldives to Iceland, and Cambodia to the British Isles. She has swum with dolphins in the Caribbean and held baby crocodiles in the Amazon. Now, she lives in Auckland, New Zealand with her golden Labrador retriever, Knox. In addition to coaching individuals and groups, Stephanie is a frequent public speaker and contributor to numerous online outlets. Learn more about her writing and research at www.StephanieHarrisCoaching.com.

Read how one woman turned to therapeutic massage to help heal from her brother's sudden death-on bettysbattleground.com

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