How Drug Use Stigma Ruins Lives

Are you letting drug use stigma turn you into a horrible person? Find out bettysbattleground.com

“Once an addict, always an addict.” This gem from the 12-step drug addiction recovery cult is one of the most harmful sentences to ever be wedged into our society, along with every other sentiment that mischaracterizes anyone who’s ever used drugs as a degenerate, selfish, walking disease. Families are being torn apart by the idea that someone who has struggled with addiction will always struggle with addiction. Families are being ruined by the misinformation that anyone who uses drugs ever is incompetent. My family is being ruined by drug use stigma. My life, my heart, and my soul are being torn apart by your blind miseducation.

I mean that, of course, as a general “you.” I don’t know who you actually are, you who are reading this. You could be the most enlightened person on this planet. You could be Shilo Jama, who runs the People’s Harm Reduction Alliance and has the most accurate views on drug use and addiction I’ve ever encountered. Or you could be someone who shares similar views. But “you” as a whole–society as a whole–are blind to the realities of drug addiction and drug use. Worse, society doesn’t care to fix it’s blindness.

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Why Being Judgy Is A Privilege (That You Probably Shouldn’t Use)

If you're judging others, you need to work on yourself--on bettysbattleground.com

Being judgy is a privilege. And while having privileges can be a positive thing, this is one in particular you probably shouldn’t be using. At least not as much as you might be.

Everyone is judgmental to an extent. Being a little bit judgmental is actually helpful; after all, assessing whether you should skirt the guy with the creepy grin who’s been following you involves making a judgment. Judgments keep us safe, they help us make friends, accomplish goals, and all sorts of wonderful, important stuff. But “being judgy” isn’t quite the same thing as making a judgment call. And it’s generally not so nice–when we’re “judgy,” we are usually putting someone else down for a characteristic we perceive to be flawed.

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