Healing Words: Five Tips to Help You Live In the Present

Trevor McDonald guest writers for bettysbattleground.com

Hey guys, today I have a guest post from a new writer to the site. Trevor McDonald joins us with some tips on how to get started living in the present. Being present has a whole host of psychological benefits, including decreased depression and anxiety. If you’re prone to trauma flashbacks, getting yourself grounded and present is a huge help. This isn’t a trauma-based approach, but I think some of these tips can still be applied. Enjoy!

bettysbattleground.comTrevor McDonald is a freelance content writer and a recovering addict & alcoholic who’s been clean and sober for over 5 years. Since his recovery began, he has enjoyed using his talent for words to help spread treatment resources, addiction awareness, and general health knowledge. In his free time, you can find him working with recovering addicts or outside enjoying about any type of fitness activity imaginable. Find him on linkedin or twitter.

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Healing Words: Helping A Loved One Heal After An Abusive Relationship

How to help a loved one heal after abuse--bettysbattleground.com

I think many of us are at a place in our lives where we recognize a great deal of injustice and pain occurring around us, but may be feeling helpless about how to help. It’s a terrible feeling to care, but have no idea how to show it or what to do. Today, guest writer Jennifer Scott shares some tips for helping with one particularly difficult-to-address scenario: helping a loved one heal after an abusive relationship.

Jennifer Scott discusses helping a loved one heal after an abusive relationshipJennifer Scott shares stories about the ups and downs of her anxiety and depression at SpiritFinder.org. She offers a forum where those living with anxiety and depression can discuss their experiences.

 

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Tales From The Other Side: The Problem With Saying “I’m Sorry”

Problems with saying I'm sorry--on bettysbattleground.com

I’m sorry!

Wait. What am I apologizing for? Existing? Having needs? What?!

Does that sound familiar to you? It sure does to me. If you have issues with saying “I’m sorry” too much (or not enough), you’ll be really interested in this guest post from Bryan Bushman, a clinical psychologist and blogger who wants to help you figure out the right time and way to say “sorry.”

The Problem with Saying "I'm Sorry" --bettysbattleground.comBryan Bushman, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist who has been working with trauma survivors for 10 years.  He is the author of Becoming Okay (When You’re Not Okay) and more of his writings can be found on www.drbryanbushman.com or http://findingyourway2okay.wordpress.com.

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