(Reblog) PTSD Stigma: Why People with PTSD Can’t “Just Get Over It”

People with PTSD can't just get over it--here's why

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stigma is alive and well. If you have PTSD, you’ve probably heard someone tell you to “just get over” your trauma. Maybe it was a well-meaning friend or family member, like my father who was frightened by my suicidal ideations. Or maybe it was a less well-meaning stranger, like the rude New Yorker who recently commented on my blog telling me to “grow up and take responsibility for [my] life.” Whether the statement comes from a place of love or stigma, it doesn’t make sense in the context of PTSD. Here’s why.

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Mental Health Heathers, Family Members, And Me

eb-writes.com

If you’d rather see my professional work rather than my angsty depressive rantings, check out my new author page eb-writes.com

This is a post about me. Because right now, I need to talk about me, and I need to feel like someone’s listening–even if they’re not. This is a post that is just about me…it won’t also turn into a post about someone else who went through it too, or someone else who’s going through it worse now. I’m not going to talk about the ways this could apply to you. If you do relate, that’s great (or maybe not so great). But today, right now, I just need to talk about me. Because I’m not doing okay.

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Healing Words: The Effects Of Rape Can Last A Lifetime

Justin discusses surviving male on male rape on bettysbattleground.com

A guest writer series about the ways we heal-on bettysbattleground.comToday’s guest post describes the experience of a survivor of male-on-male rape, which has not yet been discussed here on Betty’s Battleground. As last week’s Tales From the Other Side guest post pointed out, some people just do not believe that male rape can happen or that it doesn’t matter. But it can. It does. And it’s not okay.

In this incredibly candid post, Justin describes how he began to allow himself to recognize that the rape occurred. This isn’t a “Healing Words” article like others in the past.There won’t be a neat “how-to heal” section; instead we get insight to the acute recovery from rape. The ways in which the human mind adjusts and begins to heal from the idea of having been raped–which is not something that is given enough attention.

This post opened my eyes a lot. It has touched on some topics I need to focus on more as well. I am extremely proud of Justin for his candor, and to have the honor of publishing his eye-opening piece on my blog.

Justin is a rape survivor on bettysbattleground.comJustin Coleman is a student. He loves books and board games. His interests are maps, politics, elections, Latin America, Greece, feminism, the environment, PredictIt, Paradox games, soccer, and music you probably haven’t heard of. He has been journaling for over a decade to process the intense emotions and mood swings of his bipolar disorder. You can connect with Justin on FacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn.

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