Book of the Weeks: 5/8-5/21/2017 “Steering The Craft”

Book of the Weeks 5/8-5/21/2017 “Steering The Craft”

by Ursula K. Le GuinCheck out some great books on bettysbattleground.com

Happy Monday!

Do you grumble at that sentiment? Are Mondays grueling, groggy days during which you are forced to drag yourself through the workday while shaking off weekend withdrawals?

Or are you like me? An unemployed mama whose weekends, while filled with moments of joyful child-parent bonding, also serve as reminders that you have a job that never ends and is rarely appreciated as it should be? Like me, does Monday offer a much needed reprieve, if only for a few brief, task filled hours, while your kids spend time at school or daycare?

Either way, whether it’s a day to stumble through, or a day to celebrate some fleeting freedoms after a hectic weekend, you should spend some time doing something you love. And if you love writing, this weeks’ selection will help you do just that; in the evening after work, or the morning while your kids are at school.

I was first introduced to this book while writing my MFA thesis, another task I managed to squeeze in around full-time momming.

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Cutest study partner

For my MFA thesis, I had to submit a big creative portfolio, which I had originally planned to be a fantasy novel, but when I learned that I would be giving birth to my second child at the beginning of my thesis semester, I decided to switch to a collection of speculative fiction stories. I also had to write an academic essay that related to my studies. I decided to write it about three favorite SF luminaries whose works had predicted future events, trends, or inventions with almost preternatural accuracy: Philip K. Dick, Octavia E. Butler, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Imagine my overwhelming joy when I discovered that one of my academic thesis subjects had also written a book that would help with my creative thesis! But you don’t have to be an SF enthusiast or even a Le Guin fan to benefit from Steering the Craft (you probably do have to be a Le Guin fan to qualify as a human though; just sayin’; she’s pretty incredible).

So for this Book of the Weeks, which covers Mother’s Day, lets check out an inspirational writing tool from one of the Mothers of SF. Whether you’re an aspiring fantasy/SF writer, a blogger, or you’re working on healing your trauma through narrative fiction (guess what: I’m all three) your writing craft will benefit from this weeks’ selection.

Like all of my “Book of the Weeks” posts, this post contains affiliate links. Please read my full disclaimer at the bottom of any and every page, or in my Mission+Legal page. 

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Book of the Weeks: 4/24-5/7/2017: “Shade’s Children”

Book of the Weeks 4/24-5/7/2017: Shade's Children

This post contains affiliate links. You can view my full affiliate links disclosure at the bottom of any and every page, but, basically, if you purchase this excellent book through the links I put in this post, I will receive a small commission at no cost to you.

 

Why does nostalgia have such authority over us?

I was recently talking to a friend about nostalgia; about how we will gleefully cram junk food into our gullets or delight over terrible movies and toys that break apart in our oafish hands that are no longer sized for play. All because these things, often shoddy and undeserving of our deep affection, ignite our nostalgia.

It is a potent balm, nostalgia. It brings us back to those times when we were innocent of the vast heartbreak that life often offers; when the sun seemed always to shine, and when we could feel the boundlessness of love, as palpable as a hand on our forehead when we were sick or a hug on the playground.

A lot of things make me nostalgic. Nothing quite so much as books.  I still have my favorite books as a child, tucked away in boxes; a few still on display on a bookshelf at my mom’s house; even fewer on display in my own bookshelf. When I sometimes pick up these books to re-read them, I feel their brilliance before I even peel open their much-abused covers. I still love reading, and delight in it, but when I was a child, reading was a portal to another dimension. Reading the books I loved as a child now is more like a time machine; it takes me back to the place where reading was a form of transportation. And that is wonderful.

One common phenomenon of nostalgia that I typically bypass when it comes to books, however, is the shoddy-quality aspect. From the toys to the movies to the foods I loved as a child, most tokens that cause me to feel nostalgic are pretty much junk from a non-emotional standpoint (oh but how could Tamagotchies ever be called junk). The books I loved as a child, with few exceptions, however, tend to still be quite good reads.

This weeks’ feature book was one of my favorites as a child, and one which I still recommend now as (and to) an adult: Shade’s Children by Garth Nix.
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Book of the Weeks 3/27-4/9/2017: The Body Keeps The Score

Book of the Weeks 3/27-4/9/2017 www.bettysbattleground.com

By the way: This post uses affiliate links (and also some unaffiliated ones). You can read my full, legal disclaimer at the bottom of any and every page, but, basically, if you purchase something via one of the Amazon links on my site, I may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. Win-win!

 

Hello again Lovelies!

It’s Monday. The other Monday, that is. Which means it’s time to announce my book of the weeks.

If you missed the Book of the Weeks 3/13-3/26/2017, click here to read my review of ‘Fig’ by Sarah Elizabeth Schantz along with an exclusive bonus interview with author Sarah Schantz. You definitely don’t want to miss reading her thoughtful answers.

This week, I am taking a break from the beautiful escapism of fiction to introduce you to what I consider to be the definitive text on PTSD. Sorry guys, no author interview this time, but read on; The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van der Kolk is a book which should sit on every curious learner’s bookshelf.

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