February 8 Suicide Awareness Collaboration With TreasureLives

Suicide prevention and awareness with Betty's Battleground and TreasureLives

On February 8, 2013 Jonathan Lazarus–a brother to TreasureLives: Mental Health & Suicide Prevention and Awareness founder Melody Nolan–attempted to commit suicide. On February 8, 2016, Betty’s Battleground site author Elizabeth Brico did the same. John and Elizabeth weren’t alone in their actions. According to suicide.org, approximately 2,054 people attempt suicide every single day in the United States. Of these, an average of 82 go on to lose their lives.

Some people like to say that everything happens for a reason, but when it comes to suicide attempts, that line of thinking suggests some lives are more valuable than others. That some people are more deserving of life than others. But there is no “reason” to mental illness and suicide. Life, death and the trappings that come in between are not doled out based on who deserves what.

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Eight Articles To Read About Sexual Assault + #MeToo

Sexual assault stories to read bettysbattleground.com

This month, Betty’s Battleground is talking about sexual assault and its aftermath. This is something that has been planned for months, but as it happens, the nation is (finally) joining this conversation as well. Today, I’m sharing with you some of the stories I’ve read recently that I think you should read too.

On another note, if you’ve been seeking a place to share your story of surviving sexual assault, or loving someone who has, Betty’s Battleground has some openings this month. Check out my guest post info page and shoot me an email.

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How To Help A Loved One Who Has Been Raped

Learn about the aftermath of rape on bettysbattleground.com

The first time I was a victim of rape, I didn’t immediately realize I had been raped. I was sixteen, a virgin, and in love. I had no idea that I was still just a child, or that my boyfriend, a man seven years my senior, had been grooming me since I was fourteen years old. Or that he was also doing it to another girl, only thirteen.  Later in our relationship, he would rape me in much more obvious ways; under knife point or threat of violence. But that very first time, on a quiet day in June, I thought it was love. It didn’t matter that it was hurried and painful, or that he seemed to lose interest in me just moments later. It didn’t matter that we were in a cluttered garage, or that a thirteen year old homeless girl would soon rap the door demanding to see him. I thought it was sex, I thought he loved me, and I thought everything was okay.

Rape changed me. There’s no way to fully describe this change without experiencing it. I hope it’s something you, dear reader, never understand. But if you already do, if you’ve been raped, then you know what I mean. No matter how young or old you are, it ruins a place of sacred innocence within you. It exposes you.

This month, November, I am dedicating my blog to rape awareness.

We will be hearing from people who have been raped, and from their loved ones, about how the experience has affected them. If you’re interested in being included in this series, there are still a couple spots available; please see my guest post info page for more details and then shoot me an e-mail.

This first post describes how surviving rape has affected my mental health, followed by ways you can help someone in your life if you learn he or she has been raped. Please note that I have chosen to use she/her pronouns to reflect my own experience and also the fact that more women than men are raped; however, please understand that I believe male and gender-fluid rape victims absolutely deserve the same level of care, and that these tips apply across gender.

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